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Yosemite National Park

First protected in 1864, Yosemite National Park is best known for its waterfalls, but within its nearly 1,200 square miles, you can find deep valleys, grand meadows, ancient giant sequoias, a vast wilderness area, and much more.

Yosemite National Park is home to such famous know features as Half Dome, El Capitan, The Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, Hetch Hetchy, Cathedral Peaks, Tuolumne Medows and so many more.  It has inspired families for generations and is visited for weeks on end as well as a casual day trips from the central valley of  California and the Eastern Slope Communities of the Sierra.

From a recreational view, there are no limits to the amount of recreation one can find or experience in Yosemite’s National Park boundaries. From hiking the PCT, to floating  the Merced River in Yosemite Valley, to climbing El Capitan or exploring the vast meadows in Toulumne with your camera lens, Yosemite National Park welcomes its visitors to play and explore like children of the great explorers in its past.

“It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter.”—John Muir

Yosemite National Park is a 195-mile escape from urban San Francisco or a 315-mile journey from Los Angeles. The expansive park’s 747,956 acres or 1,169 square miles, nearly 95 percent of which are designated Wilderness, are home to hundreds of wildlife species, and over a thousand plant species. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is known for its granite cliffs, waterfalls, clear streams, giant sequoia groves and biological diversity. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors can explore 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of scenic roadways.

 

 

Exploring Yosemite By Foot

Exploring Yosemite By Car

Exploring Yosemite by Bus

Exploring Yosemite by Climbing

Yosemite Valley

Backpacking Young Lakes in Yosemite

Backpacking Young Lakes in Yosemite

Sierra Rec Magazine, August 2018 - Backpacking in Yosemite is a life goal for many who visit this pristine granite palace in the High Sierra.  As a beginning backpacker, I was overjoyed to learn in March that we had secured 6 passes into the Yosemite Wilderness and Young Lakes, for my first backpacking experience ever.  Young Lakes is a beautiful set of three high alpine lakes sitting just over 9800' at the lowest level and 10,250' at the high lake with views of Mt Conness (12,589'), Ragged Peaks and Shepard's Peak highlighting the panoramic skylines. Lower Young Lake just before Sunset. The hike into Young Lakes is approx. 7 miles and can be accessed by two main routes with three starting trail-heads. The Dog Lake route or the Toulumne Meadow Route. On our trip to Young Lakes we had access through the Dog Lake upper route that climbs up behind Lambert Dome to dog Lake than follows the range as it crosses several alpine tundra/meadow and creek regions along the eastern most ridges of Yosemite National Park. The route is challenging to beginner backpackers and the climb to start your trip is advanced because of the elevation change to Dog Lake from the parking lot.  As our group traveled this route we found a brief stop at Dog Lake allowed us to adjust our packs, grab some fuel for the remaining five mile hike and enjoy a beautiful location that is less visited than you might think being so close to Toulumne Meadow. Dog Lake in Yosemite After Dog Lake the Next 4 miles are a gradual climb as you cross...

Time to Visit California’s Gold Country

Time to Visit California’s Gold Country

California's Gold Country will soon be in full bloom & It is Time to Start Chasing Waterfalls in Tuolumne County's Yosemite Sierra Rec Magazine - Tuolumne County, CA - March 21,2019 - Spring brings wildflowers, waterfalls, and longer days to explore the abundance of adventure in Tuolumne County. California's Gold Country will soon be in full bloom. Capture the painted hills with a hike through the Red Hills and Table Mountain, or from the cab of an 1897 State Historic Park Wildflower Train. Stroll through the blossoming apple orchards at Indigeny Reserve and taste their organic hard ciders. Be wild and free like the falls that flow lavishly from the snowmelt in the High Sierra or Yosemite's lesser-known areas of Hetch Hetchy or the Grand Canyon of Tuolumne, where some have lost count of the waterfalls discovered. Pioneer all the bloomin' areas of Tuolumne County in late spring with the Epic High Sierra Loop, the road trip through the Gold Country and High Sierra via Highway 108 and Yosemite National Park's Highway 120. Complements of Tuolumne County Visitors Bureau Gold Country- Spring road trip anyone? Yes, please! Traveling southeast from Sacramento a classic Highway 49 road trip will wind through California's Gold Rush towns with rolling hills that are painted with fresh blooming wildflowers. Venture along the Golden Chain Highway and take a trip back in time to explore Columbia State Historic Park. The park has free admission and is open year-round with a working blacksmith, gold panning, stagecoach rides, an old-time photo parlor, and suds-serving saloons, but one of the most authentic experiences is the Columbia Diggins' 1852. Happening every...

National Park Foundation and Winnebago Industries Announce New Partnership Supporting America’s National Parks

National Park Foundation and Winnebago Industries Announce New Partnership Supporting America’s National Parks

FOREST CITY — For more than six decades, Winnebago Industries has created products that enable customers to explore America’s national parks. Today, Winnebago Industries, Inc. (NYSE: WGO), a leading outdoor lifestyle product manufacturer, strengthened that connection by announcing a multi-year partnership with the National Park Foundation (NPF), the official nonprofit partner of the National Park Service, in support of the Find Your Park/Encuentra Tu Parque movement. This public awareness campaign inspires people of all backgrounds and abilities to discover and share their own unique connections to America’s national parks. “Our purpose, throughout our Winnebago, Grand Design and Chris-Craft families, is to help our customers explore the outdoor lifestyle, enabling extraordinary experiences as they travel, live, work and play,” said Winnebago Industries President and CEO Michael Happe. “We firmly believe that America’s national parks offer unparalleled opportunities to experience the beauty of nature and the depth of our shared heritage at some of the most scenic and historic locations in the United States. It is an honor to support the work of the National Park Foundation in pursuit of our shared goal, to connect more people with transformative outdoor experiences.” With more than 400 national parks across the U.S., Winnebago and the Winnebago Industries Foundation will help raise awareness about parks less traveled and also lend support to NPF’s Open OutDoors for Kids program, which connects young people to national parks through meaningful, educational, and engaging activities. “This partnership not only brings parks to people by raising awareness, it also literally brings people to parks,” said National Park Foundation President Will Shafroth. “The National Park Foundation is pleased to partner with Winnebago Industries and...

Yosemite National Park Announces Late Seasonal Openings for Several Park Facilities

Yosemite National Park Announces Late Seasonal Openings for Several Park Facilities

Significant damage from heavy winter snowpack has resulted in delayed openings Yosemite National Park announces that there will be late seasonal openings to facilities throughout the park. These late openings are due to the exceptionally heavy snowpack in Yosemite National Park and the subsequent extensive damage to many park facilities. Yosemite National Park experienced significant snowfall over the winter season. The March 1 snow survey showed that both the Merced and Tuolumne River drainages are measuring at approximately 143 percent of normal (the final snow survey of the year will be conducted on April 1). Several significant storm systems in January and February produced high levels of snow, which resulted in temporary road closures, rock and debris slides, and falling trees. Additionally, these storms resulted in extensive damage to facilities throughout the park. Damage to facilities includes trees falling on and damaging campground restrooms, utilities systems compromised, tent cabins damaged or destroyed, and falling trees impacting campsites, parking areas, hiking trails, and roads. Although the park will begin plowing the Glacier Point and Tioga Roads in April, neither road is anticipated to be open before Memorial Day. Extensive snow along Tioga Road portends a late opening, park visitors should plan accordingly. Photo Courtesy of Yosemite National Park Media For the latest updates on park programs and facilities, please visit www.nps.gov/yose. Several facilities operated by Yosemite Hospitality, the park’s primary Concessioner, are also expected to open later than usual. For the latest information on concession-operated programs and facilities, please visit https://www.travelyosemite.com/. Park visitors should anticipate additional late openings, including the installation of the Half Dome cables, the Mariposa Grove Visitor Shuttle, and...

Yosemite National Park Announces that the 2019 Half Dome Preseason Lottery will Open on Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Yosemite National Park Announces that the 2019 Half Dome Preseason Lottery will Open on Wednesday, March 13, 2019

2019 preseason lottery for Half Dome permits will open at 7:00 am PDT on Wednesday, March 13, 2019. Yosemite National Park, March 7, 2019 - Yosemite National Park announces that the 2019 preseason lottery for Half Dome permits will open at 7:00 am PDT on Wednesday, March 13, 2019. For the latest information on the Half Dome preseason lottery, please visit https://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/hdpermits.htm. All hikers are required to have permits to ascend the subdome steps and the Half Dome cables seven days a week when the cables are up. Park Rangers install the Half Dome cables each spring and take them down each fall, based on weather and trail conditions. The cables are typically up from late May to early October. All day use hiking permits are distributed by lottery via Recreation.gov, with the preseason lottery in the spring and daily lotteries during the hiking season. During the preseason lottery, 225 permits are available for each day that the cables are up. To include Half Dome as part of an overnight wilderness trip please visit https://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/hdwildpermits.htm. All visitors planning to apply for permits to climb the Half Dome Cables are strongly encouraged to thoroughly read all information posted on Yosemite National Park’s Half Dome page and the “Cables on Half Dome” page managed by Recreation.gov, https://www.recreation.gov/permits/234652, as there have been some new changes to the application process. The most accurate information will be posted on both the Yosemite National Park webpage and on...

NatureBridge Summer Backpacking Programs for Teens in Yosemite and Olympic National Parks Builds Future Scientists and Leaders

NatureBridge Summer Backpacking Programs for Teens in Yosemite and Olympic National Parks Builds Future Scientists and Leaders

Registration is open for summer backpacking programs in Yosemite YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK — February 28, 2019 —NatureBridge, the largest non-profit educational partner of theNational Park Service, leads life-changing backpacking programs for middle and high school students in Yosemite and Olympic National Parks each summer. These one-week and two-week programs offer the perfect mix of backpacking, science and adventure and give participants the opportunity to conduct field science investigations in two of the most iconic national parks in the country. NatureBridge Summer Backpacking programs are designed to develop future environmental leaders as they take students on a challenging physical and academic journey into spectacular wilderness. Students participate in a multi-day backpacking adventure, conduct hands-on science projects and develop their leadership skills. Supported by a new group of friends, students return home with a deeper connection to nature, empowered to pursue their interest in environmental science. Alumni students have used their NatureBridge summer backpacking experience and research for school capstone projects, college entrance essays and job resumes. “I learned about flexibility with new people, [I gained] a deeper understanding of the life in the forest, and I also learned that I am stronger than I have ever thought,” wrote India, a 2018 Summer Backpacking participant. Registration is open for Summer 2019, with programs available in June and July. NatureBridge is excited to expand its summer offerings this year to include trips for middle school students. No backpacking experience is necessary and financial aid is available! Students and parents who are interested are encouraged to contact Katie Draude, NatureBridge Summer Programs Manager, at 415-598-9832 or kdraude@naturebridge.org. To learn more about NatureBridge’s Summer Backpacking visit naturebridge.org/summerbackpacking. About NatureBridge Founded in 1971, NatureBridge...

Yosemite National Park Impacted By Recent Winter Storms

Yosemite National Park Impacted By Recent Winter Storms

Multiple park facilities damaged by significant snowfall earlier this week Sierra Rec Magazine - Yosemite National Park updates - February 9, 2019 - Multiple park facilities, housing units, and the park’s ski area have been significantly impacted by the significant snowfall the park received earlier this week. Yosemite Valley received approximately 18 to 24 inches of snow due to storms Monday through Wednesday. Yosemite’s high country saw several feet of new snow. The large snowfall amount caused several trees to topple, power outages, roads to temporarily close, damage to park campgrounds, and the temporary closure of the park’s ski area. No injuries occurred during the storm, and park personnel worked long hours to clear roads, ensure employee and visitor safety, and keep utility and other systems operating during the significant winter storms. Approximately 50 guest cabins at Half Dome Village and 50-70 concessioner housing units were damaged or destroyed. About 150 concession employees are impacted and arrangements are being made to provide them temporary housing. All visitor services at Half Dome Village are closed while damage assessments continue and repairs begin. Upper Pines Campground is closed, as trees fell on restrooms in the campground and it is not safe for visitors. It is expected to reopen in the next several days. Yosemite Ski and Snowboard area is closed as well. Please check the park and concessioner websites for updates on openings and operating hours. The National Park Service and the park concessioner are currently working together on damage assessments, alternative housing for employees, and repairing damage to park facilities. There is no financial estimate of damage or expected times...

National Park Service Announces Entrance Fee-Free Days for 2019 Sierra Parks

National Park Service Announces Entrance Fee-Free Days for 2019 Sierra Parks

Yosemite, Lassen Volcanic, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Will Offer Five Free Entrance Days in 2019 Sierra Rec Magazine - News Release NPS - WASHINGTON – The National Park Service will waive all entrance fees on five days in 2019, giving visitors and locals an additional FEE Free opportunity to come and explore the Sierra National Parks we all love and celebrate.  These Fee Free days can be quite busy days to explore the National Parks but if the gate fee is your barrier for going, then take these opportunities to celebrate special moments in the parks. Yosemite, Sequoia, Kings Canyon, Death Valley (Which does not charge a fee ever) and Lassen Volcanic National Park are all within driving distance of each other in the Sierra.  Backp[acking permits are still required for these days in the Parks, but your entrance fee is waived. The five entrance fee-free days for 2019 will be: Monday, January 21 – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Saturday, April 20 – First Day of National Park Week/National Junior Ranger Day Sunday, August 25 – National Park Service Anniversary Saturday, September 28 – National Public Lands Day Monday, November 11 – Veterans Day “The entrance fee-free days hosted by the National Park Service are special opportunities to invite visitors, volunteers and veterans to celebrate some important moments for our parks and opportunities for service in those parks,” said National Park Service Deputy Director P. Daniel Smith. The National Park System includes more than 85 million acres and includes national parks, national historical parks, national monuments, national recreation areas, national battlefields, and national seashores. There is at least...

Snowshoeing Yosemite National Park

Snowshoeing Yosemite National Park

Snowshoeing and Cross  Country Ski  Trails in the Crane Flats Region of  Yosemite National Park Sierra Rec Magazine - Snowshoe Guides -  Yosemite National Park - Yosemite National Park like so many place in the Sierra is a completely different place from the summer destination that many know.  A great way to explore the park in winter is via Snowshoe. Hear are the best eight locations near Crane Flat in Yosemite National Park Crane Flat Lookout Trail (1.5 mi., 2.4 km, one way): This trail is an uphill (365 ft elevation gain) , rolling climb most of the way to the fire lookout, where the 360 degree views of Yosemite are spectacular. Tuolumne Grove Trail (1 mi., 1.6 km, one way): This trail descends from the trailhead (400 Feet)  the entire way to the majestic giant sequoias. This is a popular trail both with snowshoers and hikers and is an arduous return ski. Gin Flat Loop Trail (6.25 mi., 10.1 km, roundtrip): Start at the gate on the Tioga Road and go .25 mile (.4 km). From there you can continue up the Tioga Road or take the old Gin Flat Loop Trail up to Gin Flat. Either way, it’s about a 3-mile (4.8 km) climb, but then a nice ski down. Skiing back to the trailhead via the road is considerably easier than skiing back via the trail. Crane Flat Campground Trail (1.75 mi., 2.8 km, roundtrip): Wind your way through and around Crane Flat Campground, then cross a meadow to join the Clark Range View trail. Turning north takes you back to the trailhead. Clark Range View...

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